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All about LTA (merged)

DAA

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autoedge said:
Good day,

    Looking for a trip home this coming long weekend. Been away from home more then 60days with back to back TD. After submitting my leave pass the OR suggested that I may not be able to claim LTA because I have only been at the new TD location for 30days. After reading the policy I see nothing WRT this, only the 60 days away from home. Can someone shed some light on the issue. Please note I did a search and have looked at the CBI.

Before I chime in, I have to ask the most important question.  Exactly "How long, is your TD, not including travel days to and from?"

You can PM me if you like with your TD location but it is not relevant, more out of curiousity.
 

autoedge

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I have been away since may 25. Should gone home between two courses but dates ran long. Ended one course just to depart for the next one. I'm over the 60 days required. Just waiting to get approval. Do you have to have a certain number of days left on TD to take LTA?
 

DAA

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autoedge said:
I have been away since may 25. Should gone home between two courses but dates ran long. Ended one course just to depart for the next one. I'm over the 60 days required. Just waiting to get approval. Do you have to have a certain number of days left on TD to take LTA?

PM sent.  If you are already over the "60" and have NOT returned to the geographical location of your parent unit, you should be good to go.

According to my calculator you have been away for "89 days" minus 1-3 days of travel time = minimum 86 days absent from post.....
 

kratz

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I agree with DAA's post.

The other reason PRes units hesitate to approve LTA,
is answering the infamouse who's fin code question?

Higher bun fights might try to reject the entitlement,
so get your LTA pre-approved.
 

Nfld Sapper

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True but also you must satisfy the follow too:

209.51(3) (Entitlement) A member of the Regular Force – or of the Reserve Force who is both on Class "B" or "C" Reserve Service and authorized to move their household goods and effects at public expense for that Class "B" or "C" Reserve Service is entitled to LTA if all of the following conditions are satisfied after 31 January 2011:

1.the member is on leave under QR&O chapter 16 (Leave), except under article 16.18 (Retirement Leave), article 16.25 (Leave Without Pay and Allowances), article 16.26 (Maternity Leave) and article 16.27 (Parental Leave) of the QR&O;
2.the member has a family member;
3.during leave, either the member travels to see a family member or a family member travels to see the member;
4.the member provides proof of travel to an authorized destination;
5.the member is not entitled to a payment for travel expenses under section 21 (Home Leave Travel Assistance) of the Military Foreign Service Instructions; and
6.only in respect of a member with a dependant, the member is – for 60 continuous days – either entitled to Separation Expense under CBI 208.997 (Separation Expense) or absent – for service reasons – from their place of duty

For most (if not all) courses DHG and E are not moved.....

And also remeber:

209.50(5) (Number – Trips) LTA is authorized once every fiscal year, and travelling that spans two fiscal years is deemed to have occurred in the fiscal year in which the travel commenced
 

autoedge

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Good day,

  Thanks for all the info. The LTA has been approved. The Authorized  to move HG&E applies to members of the RES only. "A member of the Regular Force – or of the Reserve Force...". Since I'm REG forces that does not apply. Everyones concern was that I was on two separate TD's. I have an email that its approved and a signed leave pass. Thanks again.
 

opcougar

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Here it is....

if a divorced mbr has a child who is 6 as a dependent on file, and the rest of their biological family who lives overseas as next of kin, is there a chance of getting LTA?

It might seem like one is trying to play the system, but in all honesty if something should happen, that young kid is hardly in any way able to act or comprehend.

I know this is not a common question or situation that applies to most, just trying to see if there is any documentation / policy that can back up such a claim.

Thanks in advance
 

PMedMoe

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For travel purposes, the child is her next of kin. 

She can put an adult relative's name on the Emergency Contact form.  They're not going to contact a six-year-old.

But bottom line is, no, she cannot submit a travel claim for LTA.
 

opcougar

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PMedMoe said:
For travel purposes, the child is her next of kin. 

She can put an adult relative's name on the Emergency Contact form.  They're not going to contact a six-year-old.

But bottom line is, no, she cannot submit a travel claim for LTA.

Why is that please, and the rationale behind it. The person has no other family members in this country and they were born outside Canada in the first place. We aren't talking going on vacay here...it's legit going home to see family.
 

PMedMoe

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Because her child is her dependant. 

She falls under paragraph a;

"209.50(6) (Authorized Destinations) LTA is authorized for travel:

a. in respect of a member with a dependant,
i. by the member to their principal residence, to a spouse's or common-law partner's place of duty, or to a third location where a dependant is; or
ii. by a dependant to the member's place of duty or to a third location where the member is; and

b. in respect of a member without a dependant, i.by the member to a principal residence or to a third location where a family member is; or
ii. by a family member to the member's place of duty or to a third location where the member is."
 

Shamrock

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To verify, the custodial parent is the member of the CF; the child resides with him or her.  The extended, non-dependent family reside OutCan?
 

PMedMoe

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Shamrock said:
To verify, the custodial parent is the member of the CF; the child resides with him or her.  The extended, non-dependent family reside OutCan?

That was my read on the situation.  If a CF member is the non-custodial parent, they get a visit to their child, or their child gets a visit to them.  Paragraph a. still applies...
 

opcougar

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Shamrock said:
To verify, the custodial parent is the member of the CF; the child resides with him or her.  The extended, non-dependent family reside OutCan?

The child is on a week on / week off with both parents i.e. shared custody. There is no "custodial parent", and the CAF mbr is the one with all their family outside Canada.
 

Brasidas

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opcougar said:
The child is on a week on / week off with both parents i.e. shared custody. There is no "custodial parent", and the CAF mbr is the one with all their family outside Canada.

And next of kin remains the kid, and the only one to whom LTA is related.
 

opcougar

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Shamrock said:
To verify, the custodial parent is the member of the CF; the child resides with him or her.  The extended, non-dependent family reside OutCan?

There is no "custodial parent". The CAF member along with their ex, have a shared custody i.e. 50-50 and the CAF member is the one with family outside the country. The other party is not military
 

captloadie

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At the end of the day, if the member's child normally resides with them (either through joint or full time custody), that child is their next of kin. Therefore, they are not entitled to LTA or reverse LTA. If the member's child did not normally reside with the other parent, and was outside of 800km, the child would still be the next of kin, but the member would be entitled to LTA or reverse LTA.

The only way the member would be entitled to visit another family member other then their child, would be to remove them as a dependant on their pers file, and identify someone else as their primary next of kin.

Even more complicated would be if the member were to remarry. Their primary next of kin would default to the new spouse and any entitlement to LTA/reverse LTA to visit a child would cease.
 

Brasidas

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captloadie said:
...The only way the member would be entitled to visit another family member other then their child, would be to remove them as a dependant on their pers file, and identify someone else as their primary next of kin...

Which could be a bad option, if there are any benefits, such as PSHCP, which the parent would want to exercise for their kid.
 

captloadie

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Brasidas said:
Which could be a bad option, if there are any benefits, such as PSHCP, which the parent would want to exercise for their kid.

Very true.
 

Cbbmtt

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I'm doing an LTA in March, I'm hesitant to purchase my ticket because if there is a possibility of getting paid out for traveling via automobile, that's what I would rather do because I have stuff to bring back.

Regina to Vancouver

How do I calculate the benefit and is it a different amount should I be driving.

Example; Round trip is around $400 by air but If I drive it's 1600 km there and 1600km back.
 

Teager

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Cbbmtt said:
I'm doing an LTA in March, I'm hesitant to purchase my ticket because if there is a possibility of getting paid out for traveling via automobile, that's what I would rather do because I have stuff to bring back.

Regina to Vancouver

How do I calculate the benefit and is it a different amount should I be driving.

Example; Round trip is around $400 by air but If I drive it's 1600 km there and 1600km back.

Can't be certain as my memory is a bit hazy since I last did an LTA claim but there is a certain calculation used. You can be sure that it will be the cheapest method though. Also note that the military gets its own rates when booking a flight so it can be very different from what you see online plus or minus. You are best to talk to the clerk that will be doing your LTA claim.
 
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