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A Deeply Fractured US

Xylric

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Blackadder1916 said:
Except, in the case of the SC Guardsmen who reported that they received a pizza with glass in it, they ordered it using Uber Eats, so they had no direct communication with the restaurant that prepared their food and even the communication with Uber Eats is by an app that, while it may identify the user, doesn't provide any info as to one's temporary occupation, especially to the food preparer or even the driver who delivers the grub.

However, it should still be an important lesson that, regardless of the circumstances of deployment, using non-approved or unverified food and water sources are force protection issues.

I recall a story, which I'm not sure of the truthful nature of, involving a number of casualties during the First World War that resulted from a mere coffee break. Namely, that the water they collected to boil came from a submerged crater, and that same crater had more than one body in it. Or in other words, these poor fellows were drinking Corpse Coffee. When I was in grade school, as part of a fairly large unit on ecology and conservation, we actually covered somewhat more than the basics of survival - how to identify plants that are safely edible, how to find safe drinking water in the wilderness, how to make water safe to drink, and a fair amount more.

Didn't Sun Tzu have an entire section on the value of an enemy's food supply?
 

Weinie

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daftandbarmy said:
Wise leaders count on that happening so they don’t have to be criticized for hiring official ‘food tasters’.

:)

But what if all 12 pizzas are poisoned?
 

Weinie

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Xylric said:
I imagine what would happen then is that an offer will be made that cannot be refused...
We have gone from the mundane to the geo-politic in a post. I often advise my CoC of this: some listen, some don't. I have become increasingly apathetic when the shytestorm descends.
 

Xylric

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Weinie said:
We have gone from the mundane to the geo-politic in a post. I often advise my CoC of this: some listen, some don't. I have become increasingly apathetic when the shytestorm descends.

I get it. There's a reason why I love the Chinese concept of the Mandate of Heaven - those who rule must not lose it, or they will find themselves replaced.
 

OceanBonfire

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FedEx worker fired and New Jersey corrections officer suspended after allegedly mocking Floyd's death to protesters

A FedEx employee has been fired and a New Jersey corrections officer has been suspended after video surfaced showing them appearing to re-enact and mock the death of George Floyd during a Black Lives Matter rally in New Jersey.

Videos of the incident began circulating on social media shortly after an anti-racism march took place on Monday in the small town of Franklinville, New Jersey. The rally happened on the same day that thousands of mourners packed a church in Houston, Texas, for a public memorial in Floyd’s honour.

Several videos taken at the rally show a small group of white counter-protesters gathered at the side of the road while a procession of demonstrators make their way down the street. One of the white men is seen kneeling on the back of another man who is lying face-down on the ground while two other men stand nearby.

The kneeling man appears to be yelling at protesters as they walk by. American flags and banners supporting U.S. President Donald Trump can be seen hanging from a pair of pick-up trucks parked behind the counter-protesters.

...


https://www.ctvnews.ca/world/fedex-worker-fired-and-new-jersey-corrections-officer-suspended-after-allegedly-mocking-floyd-s-death-to-protesters-1.4980151
 

Cloud Cover

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A most awesome thread: From Inside the CHAZ.

https://twitter.com/Julio_Rosas11/status/1270432529581932544?s=20
 

mariomike

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Chicago police union threatens to kick out members who "take a knee".
https://www.google.com/search?sxsrf=ALeKk01UciJcHaBaZ1nlf5cViHH8aCBOYA%3A1592106134539&source=hp&ei=lpzlXtDEHrKRggfL7ZEI&q=chicago+police+union+kneel&oq=chicago+police+union+kneel&gs_lcp=CgZwc3ktYWIQAzIFCCEQoAEyBQghEKABOgQIIxAnOgUIABCRAjoFCAAQgwE6BQgAELEDOgIIADoECAAQAzoICAAQCBANEB46BwghEAoQoAE6BAghEBU6CAghEBYQHRAeULgRWKFOYLxSaABwAHgAgAH9AYgB-R2SAQYwLjIzLjOYAQCgAQGqAQdnd3Mtd2l6&sclient=psy-ab&ved=0ahUKEwjQ593EsYDqAhWyiOAKHct2BAEQ4dUDCAw&uact=5#spf=1592106146356
 

FJAG

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A bit of a tangent this, but in line with the racial divide element of this thread, I came across this older story which answers a question that most of us probably never asked:

The White Man in That Photo
By Riccardo Gazzaniga / griotmag.com / Oct 10, 2015

Sometimes photographs deceive. Take this one, for example. It represents John Carlos and Tommie Smith’s rebellious gesture the day they won medals for the 200 meters at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City, and it certainly deceived me for a long time.

CLvU7OGWsAAEbrX.jpg:large


I always saw the photo as a powerful image of two barefoot black men, with their heads bowed, their black-gloved fists in the air while the US National Anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner,” played. It was a strong symbolic gesture – taking a stand for African American civil rights in a year of tragedies that included the death of Martin Luther King and Bobby Kennedy.

It’s a historic photo of two men of color. For this reason I never really paid attention to the other man, white, like me, motionless on the second step of the medal podium. I considered him as a random presence, an extra in Carlos and Smith’s moment, or a kind of intruder. Actually, I even thought that that guy – who seemed to be just a simpering Englishman – represented, in his icy immobility, the will to resist the change that Smith and Carlos were invoking in their silent protest. But I was wrong.

Thanks to an old article by Gianni Mura, today I discovered the truth: that white man in the photo is, perhaps, the third hero of that night in 1968. His name was Peter Norman, he was an Australian that arrived in the 200 meters finals after having ran an amazing 20.22 in the semi finals. Only the two Americans, Tommie “The Jet” Smith and John Carlos had done better: 20.14 and 20.12, respectively.

....

Read the rest of this article here:

https://www.filmsforaction.org/articles/the-white-man-in-that-photo/?fbclid=IwAR3Bl1nIdhD8fdYJsnQThSZ_y4q_lg7CiwSnSnvUPA4CIWA2dzggs_AZT5c#.Xt-u2we7zWB.facebook

:cheers:
 

daftandbarmy

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Why the Confederate Flag Flew During World War II

As white, southern troops raised the battle flag, they showed that they were fighting for change abroad—but the status quo at home.

In July 1944, one month after the Allies stormed the beaches of Normandy, the 79th Infantry Division drove Nazi troops out of the French town La Haye-du-Puits. A young officer from Chattanooga, Tennessee, reached into his rucksack and pulled out a flag that his grandfather had carried during the Civil War. He fashioned a makeshift flagpole and hoisted it up, so that the battle-worn Confederate flag could fly over the liberated village.

The U.S. Navy and Marine Corps recently decided to ban the Confederate flag from military installations, and the Army is considering renaming 10 bases named after Confederate generals. But if you want to understand how the U.S. military came to embrace the Confederate flag in the first place, the answers lie in World War II.

When white southern troops went overseas during the war, some of them carried Confederate flags with them. As American forces took over Pacific Islands or European towns, the troops would sometimes raise the Confederate flag alongside or instead of the U.S. flag to celebrate their victory. The Baltimore Evening Sun described this as a “recurring phenomenon which has been observed in areas as widely separated as the Southwest Pacific, Italy and France.”

A major from Richmond, Virginia, raised the Confederate flag over a house after the U.S. Fifth Army captured the Italian town of Rifreddo. He told Stars and Stripes, the official military newspaper, that he’d brought a cache of flags with him and that he had already hung the Confederate flag in Naples, Rome, and Leghorn. “This is one war we’re gonna win,” he said.

In the Pacific, Marine Colonel William O. Brice of South Carolina dubbed himself the “commander of Confederate forces” in the Solomon Islands and flew the Confederate flag on the islands’ base. The Charlotte Observer praised Brice and other white marines, soldiers, and sailors for being “descendants of men who wore the gray [who] have not forgotten in the turmoil of battle, their reverence for those heroes of the [1860s].”

When the Allies secured military victory over Germany, a tank officer carried the Confederate flag into Berlin. As the USS Mississippi steamed into Tokyo Bay after Japan’s surrender, it was flying the Confederate flag.

After the war, a white sergeant from Kentucky wrote home to ask his mother to send a Confederate flag to display in a French school. “I believe we will influence the teaching of the War Between the States,” he wrote. Two former Army pilots returned from overseas and formed a “Confederate Air Force” for white southern pilots in New Bern, North Carolina.

The white troops who raised the Confederate flag during World War II argued that they were honoring the military service of their forefathers. “In its day, this flag stood for much and waved over the heads of the same type of men that made America great,” the Charlotte Observer argued. “Deep in the hearts of all Americans, the Confederacy now is merely a part of ‘One nation indivisible.’”

Not all Americans agreed. When Army Lieutenant General Simon Buckner Jr., himself the son of a Confederate general, saw a Marine unit flying the flag at the battle of Okinawa, he ordered it removed. “Americans from all over are involved in this battle,” he said.

For black Americans especially, the Confederate flag was a symbol of decades of racism, hate, and white supremacy. They fought against it being displayed before, during, and after the war. Before Pearl Harbor, for example, the Baltimore Afro-American successfully protested a plan to use the flag as the insignia of Army quartermasters stationed in Virginia at the base named for Confederate General Robert E. Lee.

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2020/06/how-us-military-came-embrace-confederate-flag/613027/
 

daftandbarmy

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George Floyd protests: Man shot in clash over Albuquerque statue

The man was shot after vigilantes and protesters clashed

A man has been shot and wounded in the US state of New Mexico after violence erupted over a statue of a 16th-Century Spanish colonist.

In recent days, statues of Confederate leaders - those from a group of southern states that fought to keep black people as slaves in the American Civil War of 1861-65 - and the explorer Christopher Columbus have been torn down in the US, as pressure grows on authorities to remove controversial monuments.

Oñate led a group of Spanish settlers - historically known as conquistadors - in 1598. He became the local governor and is known for the massacre of a pueblo - or Native American - tribe.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-53060704
 

brihard

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daftandbarmy said:
George Floyd protests: Man shot in clash over Albuquerque statue

The man was shot after vigilantes and protesters clashed

A man has been shot and wounded in the US state of New Mexico after violence erupted over a statue of a 16th-Century Spanish colonist.

In recent days, statues of Confederate leaders - those from a group of southern states that fought to keep black people as slaves in the American Civil War of 1861-65 - and the explorer Christopher Columbus have been torn down in the US, as pressure grows on authorities to remove controversial monuments.

Oñate led a group of Spanish settlers - historically known as conquistadors - in 1598. He became the local governor and is known for the massacre of a pueblo - or Native American - tribe.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-53060704

I watched the video. The shooting looks to have been a very clear case of self defense. He was retreating while being chased by a mob and having already been struck with a skateboard. He was knocked to the ground and piled on, with someone screaming “I’ll kill you”.

Prior to this he was in the protesters’ faces and may himself have assaulted someone, but by the time of this separate and subsequent transaction he was in full retreat.
 

mariomike

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FDNY issues an advisory to not use the deck gun to wash away protesters, perps or agitators.

https://twitter.com/NYCEMSwatch/status/1273063372796420096/photo/1
 

daftandbarmy

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Thus ensuring, somewhat ironically, that no 'people of colour' will ever be seen in some American neighbourhoods ever again I assume....


Aunt Jemima brand to change name, remove image that Quaker says is 'based on a racial stereotype'

“We recognize Aunt Jemima’s origins are based on a racial stereotype," Quaker Oats said, adding that the move is an effort "toward progress on racial equality."

The Aunt Jemima brand of syrup and pancake mix will get a new name and image, Quaker Oats announced Wednesday, saying the company recognizes that "Aunt Jemima's origins are based on a racial stereotype."

The 130-year-old brand features a Black woman named Aunt Jemima, who was originally dressed as a minstrel character.

The picture has changed over time, and in recent years Quaker removed the “mammy” kerchief from the character to blunt growing criticism that the brand perpetuated a racist stereotype that dated to the days of slavery. But Quaker, a subsidiary of PepsiCo, said removing the image and name is part of an effort by the company “to make progress toward racial equality.”

“We recognize Aunt Jemima’s origins are based on a racial stereotype," Kristin Kroepfl, vice president and chief marketing officer of Quaker Foods North America, said in a press release. “As we work to make progress toward racial equality through several initiatives, we also must take a hard look at our portfolio of brands and ensure they reflect our values and meet our consumers’ expectations."

Kroepfl said the company has worked to "update" the brand to be "appropriate and respectful" but it realized the changes were insufficient.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/aunt-jemima-brand-will-change-name-remove-image-quaker-says-n1231260?fbclid=IwAR1fyrI99GFqFijO6-vuDiAS45v6SMwQzZdgdBT6oInwMELBpZrEFCFT1Bc
 

Xylric

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daftandbarmy said:
Thus ensuring, somewhat ironically, that no 'people of colour' will ever be seen in some American neighbourhoods ever again I assume....


Aunt Jemima brand to change name, remove image that Quaker says is 'based on a racial stereotype'

“We recognize Aunt Jemima’s origins are based on a racial stereotype," Quaker Oats said, adding that the move is an effort "toward progress on racial equality."

The Aunt Jemima brand of syrup and pancake mix will get a new name and image, Quaker Oats announced Wednesday, saying the company recognizes that "Aunt Jemima's origins are based on a racial stereotype."

The 130-year-old brand features a Black woman named Aunt Jemima, who was originally dressed as a minstrel character.

The picture has changed over time, and in recent years Quaker removed the “mammy” kerchief from the character to blunt growing criticism that the brand perpetuated a racist stereotype that dated to the days of slavery. But Quaker, a subsidiary of PepsiCo, said removing the image and name is part of an effort by the company “to make progress toward racial equality.”

“We recognize Aunt Jemima’s origins are based on a racial stereotype," Kristin Kroepfl, vice president and chief marketing officer of Quaker Foods North America, said in a press release. “As we work to make progress toward racial equality through several initiatives, we also must take a hard look at our portfolio of brands and ensure they reflect our values and meet our consumers’ expectations."

Kroepfl said the company has worked to "update" the brand to be "appropriate and respectful" but it realized the changes were insufficient.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/aunt-jemima-brand-will-change-name-remove-image-quaker-says-n1231260?fbclid=IwAR1fyrI99GFqFijO6-vuDiAS45v6SMwQzZdgdBT6oInwMELBpZrEFCFT1Bc

Most of the people I know who are complaining about the change are black themselves...
 

mariomike

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Guess Uncle Ben is next. Haven't seen the Cream of Wheat guy on the selves in a while.
 

Remius

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Some background on both characters.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aunt_Jemima

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uncle_Ben%27s





 
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