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3 March 2005 - Four RCMP Murdered at Seized Marijuana Grow-Op

Blackhorse7

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I like to think of myself as a strong person, but I will freely admit that I wept openly last night.  I came home, looked at my wife, and just broke down.  We watched the service on TV, and I guess I just bottled up what I was feeling.
 

FGH_Recce_DJ

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Blackhorse7 you did it for your co workers yesterday, and we did it when 4 of our co workers were killed by an errant bomb, there is nothing to be ashamed about, when grief strikes you you cry, just because you cry does not mean you are not a strong individual, i cried my self at yesterdays service, i'm sure all of Canada did as well................... :cdn:
 

Swin435

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Let's try that again.

Blackhorse7;

FGH_Recce_DJ is right!  There is nothing to be ashamed about.  We as a country mourned the loss of those 4 hero's.  Hero's because the joined a group of people who are willing to lay down their lives if necessary to protect us.  Your loss and the loss of all RCMP officers everywhere will be felt by all.

 

Freddy Chef

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Blackhorse7,

You're a cop, which means you keep a cool head, and professional manner when dealing with criminals/suspects, and when dealing with the public when you are on duty.

When you are off duty, and you are dealing with the murder of four of your co-workers, breaking down just means that you are human; it means you are a man.

Knowing about the recent events, to see four Stetsons and duty belts, without their owners, would make any Canadian cry.
 

marshall sl

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Blackhorse, it's OK.
I attended the service at the E Div training Centre . The were not many dry eyes there.
When i got home and saw the clips from Edmonton on the news , it hit me as well.
 

Ranger

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I would like to send my condolences to the families of the four RCMP officers who bravey put their life on the line.
Constable Brock Myrol, 29
Constable Anthony Gordon, 28
Constable Peter Schiemann, 25
Constable Lionide Johnston, 32.
These four young, brave men were loving fathers, sons, brothers and uncles...
May you all Rest In Peace.

:cdn:  :salute:  :cdn:
 

Slim

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Mounties' killer carried 3 guns, RCMP say
By KATHERINE HARDING

Tuesday, March 22, 2005 Updated at 1:50 AM EST

From Tuesday's Globe and Mail
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20050321.wxrcmp0322/BNStory/National/

Edmonton â ” James Roszko was toting three guns including an assault-style rifle, when he massacred four rookie RCMP officers after they entered his dark, metal farm shed, according to the first detailed police account of the hours leading up to the ambush.

However, RCMP officials admitted yesterday it could take months to figure out exactly how Mr. Roszko was able to sneak back onto his northwest Alberta farm undetected and then shoot the four officers.

"There are many unanswered questions," RCMP Superintendent Marty Cheliak told a news conference about the March 3 killings â ” the force's largest loss of life in a violent act in 120 years. Killed in the line of duty were: Peter Schiemann, 25; Leo Johnston, 32; Anthony Gordon, 28; and Brock Myrol, 29.

Mr. Roszko, whom the courts had prohibited from owning firearms since 2000, was wounded by another officer who was on the property at the time of the killings. The 46-year-old then stumbled back into his farm shed and shot himself. According to the officer, Mr. Roszko was carrying a Heckler & Koch .308 semi-fully automatic rifle, had a 9 mm semi-automatic pistol in his waist band and a long barrel firearm slung over his shoulder.

Police would not say whether the Heckler & Koch was set up to fire in a fully automatic, or rapid-fire mode.

"Intense follow-up forensic examination and testing will be required to determine exactly what occurred inside the Quonset [farm shed]," Supt. Cheliak said. While the on-site investigation wrapped up late last week, according to a source, police officers spent days meticulously sifting for evidence by hand on the shed's sand floor.

The slain officers had been investigating and securing Mr. Roszko's property after a bailiff, who was conducting a property seizure of his white 2005 Ford pickup truck on March 2, uncovered a marijuana grow operation of about 280 plants along with stolen auto parts.

Despite several sightings by local residents later that day, Mr. Roszko hadn't been seen by police for 18 hours before the shootings.

Police later recovered his truck at his aunt's house, about 24 kilometres from his Mayerthorpe-area farm, according to a news report.

RCMP officials wouldn't confirm that information yesterday, nor would they say whether a recent media report stating that Mr. Roszko got back onto the property using a white sheet and socks is accurate.

However, Supt. Cheliak said that contrary to several media reports, Constable Schiemann was on duty that morning. But he was not scheduled to be at the farm and he wasn't wearing his uniform or carrying his gun.

Supt. Cheliak said another RCMP officer was scheduled to drive Constable Myrol to the Roszko farm. But at the last minute, the first officer was called back to the office, "so Constable Schiemann volunteered to drive Constable Myrol to the Roszko property."

The other officers were armed with handguns. However, their loaded rifles were in their police vehicles at the time of the shootings.

During yesterday's briefing, RCMP officials went to great lengths to stress that the evening before the killings, senior officers made sure the property was safe for officers to work in and were fully aware of Mr. Roszko's violent history.

"Strategic planning and assessments were conducted involving members who were familiar with Mr. Roszko and the area," Supt. Cheliak said, adding that all the buildings on his property were searched and that police officer safety was discussed.

"The situation was deemed to be within the capabilities of the Mayerthorpe detachment general duty members," he said.

Since the killings, at least one retired RCMP officer has publicly said that the incident was the result of a lack of supervision.

Mr. Roszko had criminal convictions dating back to the 1970s for property offences and for harassing phone calls, but he dodged a string of more serious charges for violent offences through the 1990s.

Between 1992 and 1999, he was charged with a raft of offences including obstruction of justice, impersonating a police officer, pointing a firearm, common assault, aggravated assault and counselling to commit murder. But he was acquitted on all of the charges. In 2000, he served a 21/2-year sentence for sexually assaulting a male.

Former police officers who have worked at the Mayerthorpe detachment have said recently that they went to Mr. Roszko's property several times during the 1990s, trying to retrieve his guns. In 1993, one of his trucks was even stripped down as police unsuccessfully looked for the HK .308 assault rifle.

Most of his guns had been smuggled into Canada illegally from the United States, according to Mr. Roszko's friends. Yesterday, a spokesman for Alberta's Justice Department said it has launched a review of criminal proceedings involving Mr. Roszko.

RCMP Commissioner Giuliano Zaccardelli has scheduled a news conference in Ottawa today to discuss the investigation into the deaths of the constables.

 

Infanteer

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HK 7.62mm.  These poor guys were outgunned from the get-go.

To me, this appears to be one of those tragedies that just happen - I'm not really sure how it could have been avoided.
 
D

dutchie

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HK 7.62mm.   These poor guys were outgunned from the get-go.

To me, this appears to be one of those tragedies that just happen - I'm not really sure how it could have been avoided.

I agree. No reasonable armour would have protected them. And you can't have all cops running around with C7's using military tactics in everyday policing (which is what this was until they came under fire). Only military weapons and tactics would have protected these guys.

Funny no-one has brought up (in the media, not here), that the gun-registry failed to protect those cops from a 'gun-nut'. Isn't this the exact kind of thing it was desigened to prevent? Any reasonable person knew, of course, that the Roszco's of Canada don't tend to register their illegal assault rifles with the Government (or the 'enemy', from their point-of-view).

Unfortunately, we are bound to have more and more incidents like this until we take major crime seriously(grow-ops, guns, auto-theft, etc). You can't legalize marijuana and increase the safety of cops and citizens at the same time. Unless you fail to link marijuana and organized crime.
 

Gunner

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FOUR BLACK HORSES

Four black horses without riders
Galloped the Alberta plain;
Four black horses, sent from depot
To bring the boys home again

Four black horses with empty saddles
Racing the cold prairie sun;
Four black horses arrive at the farmyard
As the last bullet leaves the gun

Four black horses stand with heads bowed
Wait til the echoes subside;
Four black horses turn as they're mounted
Now their heads held high with pride.

Four mounted policemen take hold of the reins
Spur their mounts holding lances high;
Four black horses, red serge in the saddles
Disappear in the Alberta sky

Author J.S. McGregor
 

Slim

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Durham police officer sparks tribute for True Blue Heroes

May 13, 2005


David Blumenfeld, Metroland Staff - More from this author
           
Durham Regional Police Constable Darryl Rice was driving back from Sarnia in March when he heard the bad news.

A raid on a farm in Alberta had left four RCMP officers dead -- the single worst multiple killing of RCMP officers in Canadian history. His thought then turned to the victims' families, and he knew he had to do something to help.

"Just something inside said 'I've got to step up to the plate and do something for these families,'" the 34-year-old officer said.

After the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, Const. Rice spearheaded a fund-raiser for victims' families by using T-shirts and hats. Now, after learning about the tragedy out west, he's selling wristbands to raise money for the families in Alberta who lost a son, husband or father that day in March.

The blue wristbands, inscribed with the motto "True Blue Heroes," are modeled after bracelets being sold by the Lance Armstrong Foundation to support cancer research. They cost $4 each, and Const. Rice said his goal is to raise $100,000 so he can present each family with a $25,000 cheque at the next police officers' memorial in Ottawa later this year.

"I'm hoping with the bracelet wristband, it will show a solidarity amongst police officers that we continue to remember our fallen brothers and sisters. But also for the members of the public to wear them, it shows a strong appreciation and support to the police as well," he said.

"It's basically a tribute to all police officers and law enforcement officers who have been killed in the line of duty."

Const. Rice said the support he has received from residents and fellow officers has been amazing, adding he's received orders for wristbands from as far away as Hawaii.

The wristbands, which come in adult and child sizes, can be purchased by e-mailing Darryl Rice at drice@drps.ca




 

Blackhorse7

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I wanted to throw this out to the site, for your info/ possible support.

There is a member of Durham Regional Police that has started a fund to help out the members of the four fallen brothers in Mayerthorpe AB.  He is selling wristbands (like the Lance Armstrong ones) for $4 a piece.  They are blue, and say "True Blue Heroes".  Cst. Daryll RICE intends to raise $100 000, $25 000 to each family.  After that he intends to continue the fund for ALL fallen members, regardless of what force, across Canada.  Here is a link to show the bands....

http://groups.msn.com/CanadianPoliceWives/trueblueheroes.msnw

I know it is not a thing for CF members per se, but it would mean a lot to not just me, but Cst. RICE, the four families, and the RCMP as a whole.  Think about it...  :salute:
 

scm77

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The Durham Regional Police are the police for my town.  I bought one as soon as I heard about these (they had a story in the local newspaper a little while ago) and wear it proudly. :salute:
 

KevinB

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Great idea - I wonder how the dress regs will take it

Thanks for the link

Cheers
 

atticus

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Link don't work. It says you need to apply to join the group before you can access the page, and well... i don't really think I qualify to be a Canadian Police Wife.
 

Blackhorse7

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It should work... if not then just google search True Blue Heroes, and it should provide a link to the same place.
 

atticus

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Is it just me that it doesn't work for? Even when I google it and go through it that way it still doesn't work.
 
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